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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
on. the reason why it's important is because it is a policy issue that has very broad implications. it could put the united states in a difficult position. >> woodruff: yesterday dianne feinstein expressed outrage over spying on friendly foreign leaders. she says white house officials assured her it's going to end. the white house said only that a review is underway. for his part, the president declined to address reports that he did not learn of the practice until last summer. instead, he told the fusion news channel -- >> well, first of all, i'm not confirming a bunch of assumptions that have been made in the press. there are strict law about what we do internally and that was the initial concern about the snoend disclosures. internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operate. >> woodruff: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of lawmakers called today for an end to most of the n.s.a.'s surveillance with phone records and e-mails. one of those lawmakers calling for limits to spying is wisconsin republican jim sensenbrenner chairman of the house crime and te
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)